Posts tagged with "leadership development"

Feeding Your Leadership Pipeline

AN EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT MODEL – Part 2-B: Educational Sessions and Action-Learning Projects
The four elements of the leadership development program (LDP) model are as follows:

– Formal Education Sessions
– Action-Learning Projects (ALPs)
– Individual Development Plans (IDPs)
– Mentoring and Coaching

In this blog post, I’ll focus on the first two elements: formal educational sessions and associated action-learning projects. The last two elements will be the focus of a future blog post.

Formal Education Sessions

As mentioned earlier, the topics for these sessions include topics related to not just leadership skills, but also execution skills and business acumen. I am also talking here about a series of education sessions, ideally 8 sessions scheduled quarterly over a two-year period. (Remember that a single session on any topic, no matter how good it is, is unlikely to transform a group of Hi-Pos into instant leaders.) There are dozens of potential topics for these sessions and the LDP should encompass a mix of the three areas, with the exact topics being chosen to match the needs of your Hi-Po group as perceived by the organization’s leadership team.

It is important that the Hi-Po group see the connection between each session topic and the needs of the organization. The best way of ensuring this connection is to get the organization’s leadership team involved in each session. In my book, I have an entire chapter on potential roles for the organization’s leadership to play in the LDP.
Each educational topic will lead to a group or individual action-learning project, as will be discussed below.

Action-Learning Projects

Action-learning projects (ALP) require the LDP participants to immediately start applying what they learned in each educational session. A lot of research has shown that retention of educational material increases dramatically when people start using the content immediately.
With education sessions scheduled once a quarter, this allows a three-month window for each ALP. Some of these projects should be assigned to teams of participants, with each team chosen for diversity of business unit, function, and geography, and some to individual participants. I suggest that the first several projects be team projects to help participants build ties with other participants.

What types of ALPs should be assigned? There are several considerations here. First, remember that the participants will be working on the ALPs in addition to their regular jobs. We generally set the expectation that the LDP will require participants to invest an additional 10% to 15% of their time, over and above their regular jobs, to the program, so we’re talking about 4 to 6 hours per week. Second, participants will be required to report back on their projects at the start of the next educational session. With quarterly sessions, this means that they will have about 13 weeks to work on the ALP.

The next consideration is what types of projects should be assigned and who should choose the topics for the projects. The ALPs should NOT be mission-critical assignments – if there is a mission-critical project that the organization needs done, it should put together the best possible team from the entire organization, not just a group of untested Hi-Pos. Better to assign what we’ll call “nice-to-have” projects – projects that will contribute to the success of the organization, but which are not mission-critical. Remember that the LDP is designed to develop AND test the capabilities of the Hi-Pos, and not every project will necessarily be successful.

My favorite source of action-learning projects comes from the meeting minutes of the organization’s leadership team. If you review these minutes over a period of a few years, you will find that there are many ideas that have been discussed and found of interest to executives, but have never been deemed so important that the organization actually assigns staff to implement. For example, in a group I once worked in, we had examined the meeting minutes over a 5-year period and found that there were issues discussed 5 years earlier that were still being discussed. It wasn’t that these issues were unimportant, but that they never were given a high-enough priority to assign people and resources to their resolution. These are ideal ALPs – if the ALPs on these issues are successful, everyone will welcome the solution to these longstanding issues, and if the ALPs are NOT successful, the issues just remain unresolved, e.g., maintain the status quo.

The fact that the LDP participants know that they will have to report their results to a panel of organizational executives at the start of the next program is generally all the motivation they will need to do a good job. And if they do not do a good job, it’s better know this before they get promoted to a more senior position in the organization.
In my book, Feeding Your Leadership Pipeline, I present a lot more information on choosing action-learning projects. The appendix to the book also describes a dozen potential educational topics for the LDP and suggests the types of ALPs that might be attached to each topic.

In the next blog post, I’ll discuss the final two elements of the LDP model.

As always, your comments and feedback are more than welcomed.

Feeding Your Leadership Pipeline

An effective leadership development model – Part 1: Identifying High-Potential Employees

In my book, Feeding Your Leadership Pipeline: How to Develop the Next Generation of Leaders, I present an effective model for putting together a leadership development program within an organization. While there are many models for leadership development in the marketplace, this is a model I developed almost 20 years ago from my own experience and the experiences of many other companies that I have researched for my books and others with which I consulted, and it is a proven model.

In this series of blogs, I will present the essence of this model. You will find more detail in my book and in some of the articles on my website.

This first part discusses how to identify candidates for your leadership development program, i.e., those employees who are believed to have high potential for future leadership roles within your organization. To learn more about this, please click on the “Articles” tab at the top of this page and then on my article “Competencies and Indicators of High Potential.”

I hope you find them of value to you as you strive to develop your own organization’s next generation of leaders. As always, I welcome your reactions and feedback — I am always on the lookout for new ideas.

Dan Tobin