DEC’s Networks University – Part 1

About 10 years ago, the company for which I was working hired a new vice president of sales.  I saw in the announcement that she had worked for Digital Equipment Corporation and that her time there overlapped with my own 11 years there.  One day, I stopped in to see her.  I told her that her name was familiar and she said that my name rang a bell as well.  She asked me what I did there and I said that, among other things, I had created a program called Networks University.  “Oh!” she exclaimed.  “I just loved Networks U.  I’ve never seen anything like it, before or since.  It was just the best program.”  And this was more than 20 years later.

While subsequent posts will provide background on the creation and operation of Digital Equipment Corporation’s (DEC) Networks University, here are some basic statistics on this remarkable program.  While it took a few years to get everything up to speed, once we got there we were running Networks University:

  • Twice a year in the U.S. for an audience of around 600 people
  • Twice a year in Europe for an audience of around 400 people
  • Once a year in the Pacific Rim for an audience of around 200 people
  • Each week-long program included 40 to 70 separate sessions, ranging from one hour to three days
  • For each 6-month cycle, 80% of the content was brand new
  • In terms of the content of the session, it was all planned by 2 to 3 people (more were involved in the logistics of the events)

Network U was unique, not just for Digital, but in the computer industry (we had many people hired from other computer companies attending the program and they said that their previous companies had nothing to compare).  Networks U was not a “training program” in the traditional sense, but more of a “learning event” where everyone in the networks world (sales, field service, software services, marketing, engineering, support groups, etc., came together to share what they had learned and to learn from each other.

When you walked into the hotel where we held a session, there was an electricity in the air, an excitement that I have never experienced in any other program I created or attended.

Did everything work perfectly?  Of course not.  With each iteration of the program, we made improvements and corrected things that didn’t go so well in previous programs.

My hope is that by sharing my experiences with the program other training professionals can benefit from my own experiences.  In the next blog entry, I’ll provide some background on Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), a company that pioneered the mini-computer.  While DEC no longer exists, at its height around 1987 employed 125,000 people around the world.

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